Fellows Colloquium—Identity in Objects
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Upper East Side


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The Met's current fellows present brief papers on their research and explore common scholarly questions in panel discussions. Today's schedule is:

10:00 a.m.

Erin Peters, Chester Dale Fellow, Egyptian Art, "Egypt in Empire: Augustan Temple Building in Roman Egypt"

Kimberly Cassibry, Pat O'Connell Memorial Fellow, Medieval Art and The Cloisters, "Roman Conquest and the Lost Art of Gallic Coins in Ancient France"

Anne Hunnell Chen, Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellow, Ancient Near Eastern Art, "Competition Between Rivals: The Role of Artistic Exchange in Late Roman and Sasanian Court Commissions"

Panel discussion with Helen C. Evans, Mary and Michael Jaharis Curator of Byzantine Art, Medieval Art and The Cloisters

Intermission

11:40 a.m.

Eriko Tomizawa-Kay, Andrew W. Mellon Fellow, Asian Art, "The Metropolitan Museum's Collection of Modern Japanese Paintings and Prints and the Late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Art Market in the United States."

Aoife O'Brien, Andrew W. Mellon Fellow, Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, "Ango, An Artist of Roviana Lagoon: Artistry, Patronage, and Collecting in the Western Solomon Islands during the Early Twentieth Century"

Diana Greenwold, Douglass Foundation Fellow in American Art, The American Wing, "'Ancient Designs Adapted to Modern Uses': New York's Scuola d'Industrie Italiane, 1905–1927"

Panel discussion with Yaëlle Biro, Assistant Curator, Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas

These colloquia are made possible in part by Mrs. Henry S. Blackwood.

Part of Fellows Colloquia.

Free with Museum admission






Exhibition Tour—The Flowering of Edo Period Painting: Japanese Masterworks from the Feinberg Collection
With Midori Oka
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Upper East Side


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Midori Oka, Research Associate, Department of Asian Art, MMA

Contemplate superb examples of Edo painting in this exhibition, including works by painters who broke from academic styles, and so-called "eccentric" artists working in Japan between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries.

Free with Museum admission






Innocents Abroad: Nineteenth-Century American Painters in Europe - H. Barbara Weinberg
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Upper East Side


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Mary Cassatt (American, 1844–1926 ). Portrait of the Artist (detail), 1878. Watercolor, gouache on wove paper laid down to buff-colored wood-pulp paper; 23 5/8 x 16 3/16 in. (60 x 41.1 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Bequest of Edith H. Proskauer, 1975 (1975.319.1)



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H. Barbara Weinberg, Curator Emerita, The American Wing, MMA

Most leading nineteenth-century American painters sought instruction and inspiration in Europe. This series focuses on their studies abroad–in Germany, England and France–and the effect of these experiences on their art, whether they remained overseas or returned home. Today's discussion will examine artists in France (Eakins, Cassatt, and others).

Tuesday, March 11th, and Tuesday, March 25th, at 11:00am

Click here to purchase the series.

This lecture is made possible by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund.

Tickets to this event include Museum admission.






Ai Weiwei: According to What?
Brooklyn Museum
Opening on
On View
Brooklyn Museum
Rest Of Brooklyn

Hours:
Wednesday 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 11:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Friday - Sunday 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM


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Ai Weiwei, 2012. Photo by Gao Yuan









Kings
Jill Mason
Nicelle Beauchene Gallery
Opening on
On View
Nicelle Beauchene Gallery
East Village / Lower East Side

Hours:
Wednesday - Sunday 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM


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Jill Mason









GODZILLA: THE JAPANESE ORIGINAL
Film Forum
Opening on
On View
Film Forum
Greenwich Village / West Village


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Friday, April 18 - Thursday, April 24
GODZILLA: THE JAPANESE ORIGINAL
1:15 3:15 5:15 7:30 9:45

$7.50 Member $13.00 Regular

Directed by ISHIRO HONDA
60TH ANNIVERSARY RESTORATION
GODZILLA: THE JAPANESE ORIGINAL

(1954) On a sunny day with calm waters, a Japanese steamer sinks in flames when the sea erupts; a salvage vessel sent to the rescue disappears the same way; exhausted, incoherent survivors babble of a monster. Could it be...? Then the biggest-budgeted film in Japanese history, the original Godzilla spawned 60 years of sequels and remakes, countless rip-offs, and a new genre: the kaiju eiga, or Japanese monster movie. Released in the U.S. in a butchered version called Godzilla: King of the Monsters, it was re-cut, re-arranged and atrociously dubbed, with cheesy new scenes (shot in Hollywood) of a pre-Perry Mason Raymond Burr observing the action from the sidelines. To make room for Burr and to excise a strong anti-nuclear subtext, King of the Monsters deleted 40 minutes of the Japanese version — its very heart — including the opening credits and ominous main theme by the great Akira Ifukube; Tokyo commuters wisecracking about surviving yet another disaster; a vituperative session in the Japanese parliament; a TV announcer’s hilarious stomp-by-stomp account of the monster’s rampage; the original cautionary ending; and more scenes with the real (human) star of the movie, Takashi Shimura (also the Seven Samurai leader that year). A tour de force by special effects genius Eiji Tsuburaya, whose use of “suitmation,” the often-belittled “man in a monster suit” method, was due to time and budget restraints. But, in concert with noirish cinematography, this low-tech approach is still as thrilling as ever. Subtitles by Bruce Goldstein and Michie Yamakawa. Approx. 96 min. DCP restoration.

A RIALTO PICTURES RELEASE






Da inventare sul posto
MoMA
Performance on
MoMA
Midtown


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Jannis Kounellis. Da inventare sul posto (To invent on the spot). 1972. Oil and graphite on canvas, 97 1/4 x 118 1/8". Rheingold Collection. Photo: The Museum of Modern Art, Imaging Services



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Among the works included in the exhibition Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New is Jannis Kounellis's Da inventare sul posto (To invent on the spot) (1972), which comprises both a painting and a performance featuring a violinist and ballerina. While the painting is on view at all times, live performances are presented at specific times throughout the exhibition. These performances are facilitated in collaboration with Brooklyn Ballet.

In conjunction with the exhibition Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New






Fists in the Pocket
MoMA
Editor's Pick
Screening on
MoMA
Midtown

Additional Screenings:
Sunday April 27, 2014 5:30 PM


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Fists in the Pocket. 1965. Italy. Directed by Marco Bellocchio. Courtesy Photofest



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Fists in the Pocket
1965. Italy. Written and directed by Marco Bellocchio. With Lou Castel, Paola Pitagora, Marino Masé. Blending politics and psychology, Bellocchio’s first feature, made when he was 26, was among the first Italian films to give voice to the anger and alienation that would define the generation of 1968. Riding that resentment, the Dutch actor Lou Castel became a cult figure as the seizure-prone young man who unilaterally decides that the world would be better off without some members of his decaying, haute bourgeois family—including his blind mother (Liliana Gerace), whom he lures into walking off a cliff. In Italian; English subtitles. 105 min.

In the Film exhibition Marco Bellocchio: A Retrospective






From “La Voie Humide”
Tunga
Luhring Augustine
Opening on
On View
Luhring Augustine
Chelsea

Hours:
Tuesday - Saturday 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


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Tunga From “La Voie Humide”
Chelsea
Apr 19 - May 31, 2014

Luhring Augustine is pleased to announce an exhibition of new work by Tunga. This marks the artist’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery and includes sculptures and drawings conceived over the past few years. For four decades Tunga has created a complex personal mythology through his integrated and evocative body of work, which includes sculpture, installation, performance, film, drawing, and writing. His practice is a synthesis of multifarious interests in poetry, psychology, physics, alchemy, and metaphysics, and is expressed with a distinctive sensual and poetic sensibility.

Following in the tradition of Joseph Beuys’s ceremonial environments, Tunga relies on a repeated use of symbolic materials such as crystals, sponges, rubber, wood, bronze, glass vessels, and ceramics. The tripod is a recurring structural component in his new sculptures, which incorporate such variety of media and resemble monumental totemic objects resulting from an enigmatic ritual. Tunga’s new ink drawings made on diaphanous handmade paper address similar concerns as those developed in his sculptures; each features a continuous line, linking disparate bodily forms that overlap to create larger anthropomorphic images, which emerge and recede. For Tunga, the drawings bring to mind “formulas, recipes, concoctions,” and “evoke scenes from pre-scientific iconography where an image can be translated into an element of transmutation.” As art historian Michael Asbury has noted, at the heart of Tunga’s practice lies a “desire to uncover the mystical undercurrents of modernity.”

Born in 1952, Tunga lives and works in Rio de Janeiro and is widely considered one of the leading Brazilian artists of his generation. He has had numerous solo exhibitions at museums internationally, and has presented major installations at the Venice Biennale, Documenta X, and four iterations of the São Paulo Biennial, in which he will be featured for a fifth time later this year. His work is included in the permanent collections of several institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid; and the Moderna Museet, Stockholm. In September 2012 a second major permanent pavilion dedicated to Tunga opened at the Instituto de Arte Contemporânea Inhotim in Brumadinho, Brazil. Most recently, Tunga was included in Brasiliana: Installations from 1960 to the Present at the Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt am Main, and in Imagine Brazil, which originated at the Astrup Fearnley Museet in Oslo and will be traveling to several institutions throughout Europe, Russia, and Brazil.






Massif Central Launch Party
Joshua Abelow, Ellen Berkenblit, Ry Fyan, Chris Lux, Keegan McHargue, Jonas Wood
Massif Central
Opening on
Massif Central
East Village / Lower East Side


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Come celebrate the launch of Massif Central's Spring/Summer 2014 Collection

Featuring 100% silk scarves designed by contemporary artists:

Joshua Abelow
Ellen Berkenblit
Ry Fyan
Chris Lux
Keegan McHargue
Jonas Wood

Each artist has produced an edition of 50 silk carrés (squares), measuring the classic French 90x90 centimeter size.

Established in 2013, Massif Central is a Brooklyn-based company that produces 100% silk scarves by contemporary artists. Interested in the trajectory of traditional French silk scarf-making, Massif Central is named after the region in France where the artform originated. The carrés (or squares) that we offer here are the classic 90x90 centimeter size and feature hand sewn hems.

We work with a small group of artists, each devoted to the pursuit of their individual vision, to create a dynamic and distinct collection of high-end silk artworks. Each artist’s design has been produced in an edition of 50, with hand numbered labels. Our vision has grown from our interest in blurring the lines between modern design, timeless fashion, and contemporary art-making methodologies.