Archeo
Antoine Catala, Isabelle Cornaro, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Yngve Holen, Gavin Kenyon, Josh Kline, Marianne Vitale
High Line
Opening on
On View
High Line
Chelsea


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Marianne Vitale, Common Crossings, 2013. Courtesy of the artist and Zach Feuer Gallery.



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An outdoor group exhibition about technology and obsolescence, Archeo brings together the work of artists who employ outmoded technologies and outdated machinery as a reflection on humanity’s continuous fascination and frustration with technology.

Today, many young artists engage with technology by exposing both its fragilities and merits. Their artworks embody an attitude that is simultaneously critical and nostalgic, in which the optimistic idealism of technological progress is countered by a disenchanted skepticism. Some of the works in the exhibition describe a recent past which resembles a dystopian future, featuring a wasteland of discarded machines and castaway objects. Other artists are more enthusiastic about the potential of technology but warn us against its dangerous side effects and its planned obsolescence. Some of the artworks on view disclose a return to the handmade and an attraction to organic forms and materials. These sculptures resemble relics and findings of an archaeology of the future.

Archeo will feature international artists including:

New York-based artist Antoine Catala (b. 1975, France) is well-known for his sculptures that integrate cutting edge technology, including holograms, 3D printing, and morphing, in response to technology’s governance of our interpretation of images. For Archeo, the artist presents a new kinetic sculpture which intermittently expands and contracts as to mimic the breathing rhythm of a part organic, part artificial creature.

Isabelle Cornaro’s (b. 1974, France) initial training as an art historian specializing in sixteenth and seventeenth-century Western art influences her unique visual language. For the High Line, Cornaro presents a suite of columns from her series God Box (2013). These monoliths contain assemblages of myriad objects, unified through their casting. Though they incorporate modern objects, Cornaro’s cast monolithic blocks resemble sixteenth-century wunderkammer or artifacts from ancient cultures preserved in a time capsule.

Jessica Jackson Hutchins (b. 1971, United States) creates sculptural installations and collages from repurposed domestic objects. Rather than exhibiting her works upon traditional pedestals, Hutchins displays her ceramic and papier-mâché constructions in precarious environments which are charged with personal memories and collective associations. For the High Line, she will present two new sculptures: a ceramic piece gently balancing on a hammock stretched among trees and a new sculpture sitting on an armchair.

In his sculptural accumulations of everyday objects, Yngve Holen (b. 1982, Germany) investigates our increasing entanglement with technology in terms of its material and symbolic origins and its influence on our sense of reality. His anthropomorphic titles instill his artificial forms – such as rubber tires, construction tools, and consumer goods – with a somatic sensibility. In this sense, Holen’s work comments upon the intersection of man and the manmade. For Archeo, Holen presents a series of three sculptures made out of washing machine drums.

Gavin Kenyon (b. 1980, United States) produces abstract sculptures that assume a biomorphic quality. Drawing his inspiration from the woodlands of Upstate New York where he grew up, Kenyon creates his bulbous forms through the chance-laden process of filling fur-lined bags with plaster and constraining them with rope. This method yields an organic texture that recalls the surreal bodies of Hans Bellmer and the visceral blobs of Lynda Benglis. For Archeo, Kenyon will realize a sculpture resembling a crumbled monument from a distant past.

Josh Kline (b. 1979, United States) employs new modes of production in his utilization of 3D scanners and contemporary consumer products to create sculptural installations. For Archeo, Kline will install an industrial refrigerator on the High Line. The fridge contains homemade smoothies which are made with unusual substances spanning from kale chips and squid ink to sneakers and yoga mats, each ironically describing a character, thus parodying the energy drink culture and the customization of taste.

New York-based artist Marianne Vitale (b. 1973, United States) has been realizing a series of installations that combine vernacular sculpture and American folklore to expose unexpected connections between ideology and architecture. On the High Line, Vitale presents Common Crossings (2014), a series of dramatic sculptural elements realized with decommissioned steel railroad tracks that are used to change the directions of trains and to allow tracks to cross each other. Installed on the High Line, itself a re-purposed railway, the crisscrossed tracks, also known as frogs, evokes the history of the park as well as Westward Expansion and industrialization in America. Vitale’s railroad tracks expand upon her fascination with excavating and reinterpreting symbols of the American frontier to reveal the underlying anxiety towards progress in contemporary culture.


High Line Art is presented by Friends of the High Line and the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation. Major support for High Line Art comes from Donald R. Mullen, Jr. and the Brown Foundation, Inc. of Houston, with additional funding provided by David Zwirner Gallery, and Vital Projects Fund, Inc. High Line Art is supported, in part, with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.






View of Dawn in the Tropics: Paintings, 1989–1990
Julian Schnabel
Gagosian Gallery
Opening on
On View
Gagosian Gallery
Chelsea

Hours:
Tuesday - Saturday 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


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JULIAN SCHNABEL, Untitled (detail), 1990, Resin and gesso on burlap 120 x 108 inches (304.8 x 274.3 cm)









euqinimod & costumes
Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster
303 Gallery
Opening on
On View
303 Gallery
Chelsea

Hours:
Tuesday - Saturday 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


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Ludwig II, 2013



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303 Gallery is pleased to present "euqinimod & costumes", our first exhibition of the work of Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster.

For her first exhibition at 303 and in a New York gallery, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster will present a new typology of works by revealing an unusual part of her personal archives from the mid-sixties until now, both intimate and social, both fetishistic and symptomatic: her personal clothing and textiles.

While walking through the exhibition "Club to Catwalk: London Fashion in the 1980s" at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, Gonzalez-Foerster had an epiphany that the inflatable Michiko Koshino coat with a movable tail she used to wear belonged to the museum collection and that the exhibited Michiko Koshino coat actually belonged to her wardrobe. Through this revelation a conversation followed, not about fashion, trends, brands, lifestyles, but on clothes and textiles in a larger sense as possible autobiographical evidences and as the symptoms of Gonzalez-Foerster's artistic personality through different periods. Corresponding to different aspects of her practice and to an exhibition itself as far as textiles and clothing could be considered as ready-mades and narratives, Dominique's wardrobe constitutes a new field of exploration into the biographical self.

Gonzalez-Foerster's work has a history of a strong and vivid relation to textiles and clothing considered not only as materials and surfaces but also as objects of meditation and reverie. Textiles have been present in different forms, like carpets combined with books in her various "tapis de lecture", and in different forms as well, such as in "Nos années 70" under the form of an Indian fabric bringing back her mother's room in the seventies, or in "RWF", staging Rainer Werner Fassbinder's room with a brown velvet spread covering the filmmaker's bed. In 2012, Gonzalez-Foerster began work on the the ongoing opera project "M.2062", connecting her research with 19th century issues and the Gesamtskunstwerk, appearing in costume as characters including King Ludwig II, Scarlett O'Hara and Edgar Allan Poe. Clothes evolve from being canvases for moods, attitudes and psychological moments similar to rooms, spaces and dioramas; they turn into apparitions as characters become costumes. By twisted extension, this logic is taken to a new conclusion: Gonzalez-Foerster's clothes appear as costumes, narratives and fictions which mirror a fragmented and multiple inner self.

A subjective description of a selection of works from this exhibition will be featured in the upcoming booklet "euqinimod and costumes" composed by Tristan Bera.

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster lives and works in Paris and Rio de Janeiro. In 2015, her career will be the subject of a major survey exhibition at Museum of Modern Art, Rio de Janeiro and Centre Pompidou, Paris. In May of this year, 1984-1999 The Decade will open at the Centre Pompidou-Metz in France, where Gonzalez-Foerster has designed all scenography and the exhibition scape. Recent solo exhibitions of her work include Splendid Hotel, Palacio de Cristal in collaboration with the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid; M.2062, Stedelijik Museum, Amsterdam; Belle Comme le jour, Art Unlimited, Basel; T.1912, Guggenheim Museum, New York; chronotopes & dioramas, Dia Art Foundation, New York; TH.2058, Turbine Hall, Tate Modern, London; Nocturama, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y Léon; Expodrome, Musée d'art moderne de la Ville de Paris/ARC; Multiverse, Kunsthalle Zürich; and Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster - Prix Marcel Duchamp, Centre Pompidou, Paris. She also participated in Making Worlds, the 53rd Venice Biennale; Skulptur Projekte Münster; and Documenta 11, Kassel (2002). Gonzalez-Foerster is the recipient of the 2002 Marcel Duchamp Award.

303 Gallery represents the work of Doug Aitken, Valentin Carron, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Ceal Floyer, Karel Funk, Maureen Gallace, Tim Gardner, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Rodney Graham, Mary Heilmann, Jeppe Hein, Jens Hoffmann, Larry Johnson, Matt Johnson, Jacob Kassay, Karen Kilimnik, Elad Lassry, Florian Maier-Aichen, Nick Mauss, Mike Nelson, Kristin Oppenheim, Eva Rothschild, Collier Schorr, Stephen Shore, Sue Williams, Jane and Louise Wilson,

303 Gallery is open Tuesday-Saturday from 10 am - 6 pm. For further information please visit us at www.303gallery.com or contact Cristian Alexa, Kathryn Erdman, Thomas Arsac or Erika Weiss.






Red Yellow Blue
Sherrie Levine
Paula Cooper Gallery
Opening on
On View
Paula Cooper Gallery
Chelsea

Hours:
Tuesday - Saturday 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


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Sherrie Levine, Tight Coffin, 2013; cast bronze; 8 1/2 x 29 1/2 x 10 in. (21.6 x 74.9 x 25.4 cm); Edition of 12, 3 APs



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Sherrie Levine

Red Yellow Blue

April 17 - May 23, 2014
534 W 21st Street

NEW YORK—The Paula Cooper Gallery is pleased to present Red Yellow Blue, an exhibition of new works by Sherrie Levine. The exhibition will open to the public on April 17 and remain on view through May 23, 2014, at 534 West 21st Street.

The title Red Yellow Blue is taken from Aleksander Rodchenko’s three panel monochrome of 1921, Pure Red Color, Pure Yellow Color, Pure Blue Color, a work he exhibited in a Constructivist exhibition in Moscow and about which he later declared, “I reduced painting to its logical conclusion… it’s all over.”

The question of an endgame, so central to any account of modernism, is raised anew in Levine’s exhibition, which extends her investigation into the movement’s foundational myths and repressed memories. The works on view include two bronze sculptures, Tight Coffin (modeled after an child's antique coffin) and Bird Mask (based on a mask from Papua New Guinea) as well as sets of red, yellow and blue mirror works. These material reenactments both conjure up and deflect art historical precedents, with allusions to primitivism, Constructivism and the still life genre. Together they explore the conflation of eroticism and death, a tension that has shaped major intellectual and philosophical currents of modernity.

Sherrie Levine was born in Hazelton, Pennsylvania, grew up in St. Louis and moved to New York in 1975. Her work has been the subject of many one-person exhibitions, including at the ICA, London (1983); the Hirshhorn Museum, Washington D.C. (1988); the High Museum of Art, Atlanta (1988); the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco (1991); the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia (1992); Portikus, Frankfurt (1994); Museum Haus Lange, Kunstmuseen Krefeld, Krefeld, Germany (2010); the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2011-12); and the Portland Art Museum, Portland, OR (2013). Her work will be on view at the Whitney Museum as part of the 2014 Whitney Biennial from April 16 through May 25. She lives and works in New York and Santa Fe, NM.

For more information, please contact the gallery: (212) 255-1105; info@paulacoopergallery.com






Chez Perv
Gardar Eide Einarsson, Matias Faldbakken, Oscar Tuazon
Team Gallery | Wooster Street
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On View
Team Gallery | Wooster Street
Soho

Hours:
Wednesday - Saturday 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday 12:00 PM - 6:00 PM


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Team is pleased to present a collaborative exhibition of work by Gardar Eide Einarsson, Matias Faldbakken and Oscar Tuazon. The exhibition, entitled Chez Perv, will run from 17 April through 01 June 2014. The gallery is located at 47 Wooster Street, between Grand and Broome, on the ground floor. Concurrently, our 83 Grand Street space will house an exhibition of sculptures by New York-based Daniel Turner.

Longtime friends and collaborators, Einarsson, Faldbakken and Tuazon share a fascination with industrial/architectural forms and materials, as well as the potentially harmful politics they can contain. Although their respective bodies of work are formally divergent, the artists are linked via their employment of various artistic acts of appropriation – of form, iconography and ideology – to ends that are at once academic and revolutionary. The exhibition’s title is culled from that of a New York Post cover story released at the height of the Dominique Strauss-Kahn sex scandal.

Although they now live on separate continents, the artists have, in a sense, grown up together, developing their individual practices alongside and in response to one another. Einarsson and Faldbakken first met in 1999, when the latter was working primarily as a novelist, still in the early stages of his career as a visual artist. The two worked together for three years as co-editors of the periodical UKS Forum. Included in a 2003 architecture-themed issue of the magazine were interviews with Clark Richert and Vito Acconci by Tuazon and Einarsson respectively, as well as an essay by Faldbakken. Tuazon and Einarsson would both work as studio assistants for Acconci while living in New York City, as well as overlapping in their completion of the Whitney Independent Study Program. The three have also continued their conversation and collaboration with one another via their mutual representation by the Norwegian gallery Standard [Oslo].

Oscar Tuazon was born in 1975 and lives and works in Los Angeles. He has shown internationally, including solo shows at Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland; Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, Netherlands and the Museum of Contemporary Art in St. Louis. His work was featured in the 2012 Whitney Biennial.

Matias Faldbakken was born in 1973 in Denmark and lives and works as both an artist and writer in Oslo. He has been the subject of numerous one-person exhibitions such as Office for Contemporary Art, Oslo, Norway; The Power Station, Dallas, TX and Kunsthalle St. Gallen, Switzerland. He represented Norway in the 2005 Venice Bienale, and was included in the most recent DOCUMENTA.

Gardar Eide Einarsson was born in Norway in 1976 and now resides primarily in Tokyo. He was recently the subject of a survey show, Power Has a Fragrance, which opened at Oslo's Astrup-Fearnley Museum and then traveled to the Reykjavik Art Museum, Bonniers Konsthall in Stockholm and the Fridericianum in Kassel. Additional solo museum exhibitions have been held at the Kunstverein Frankfurt; Centre d'Art Contemporain, Geneva and The Modern Art Museum, Fort Worth, TX. His work was featured in the 2008 Whitney Biennial.

Gallery hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 10am to 6pm; Sundays, Noon to 6pm. For further information and/or photographs, please call 212 279 9219.






Unexpected Encounters in Modern Sculpture
With Marianna Siciliano
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Upper East Side


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Marianna Siciliano, Assistant Educator, MMA

Be surprised by works of art that spin, turn, and stare back as you explore contemporary sculptures that activate a relationship with the viewer in unexpected ways, including works by Jean Tinguely and Kiki Smith.

Free with Museum admission






Da inventare sul posto
MoMA
Performance on
MoMA
Midtown


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Jannis Kounellis. Da inventare sul posto (To invent on the spot). 1972. Oil and graphite on canvas, 97 1/4 x 118 1/8". Rheingold Collection. Photo: The Museum of Modern Art, Imaging Services



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Among the works included in the exhibition Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New is Jannis Kounellis's Da inventare sul posto (To invent on the spot) (1972), which comprises both a painting and a performance featuring a violinist and ballerina. While the painting is on view at all times, live performances are presented at specific times throughout the exhibition. These performances are facilitated in collaboration with Brooklyn Ballet.

In conjunction with the exhibition Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New






One-Day Exhibition of New Sculptures by Paweł Althamer & Collaborators
New Museum
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New Museum
East Village / Lower East Side


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Last Weeks of “Paweł Althamer: The Neighbors” at New Museum Features
One-Day Exhibition of New Sculptures Created During Residency at New Museum on Thursday April 17
and
Distribution of Draftsmen’s Congress: Visitors Can Take Home a Piece of this Collaborative Public Painting from April 23–27


New York, NY…. During the final weeks of Polish artist Paweł Althamer’s first US museum show, the artist will invite the public to a one-day exhibition of new sculptures made on-site and will distribute pieces of Draftsmen’s Congress to New Museum visitors.

Since the opening of “The Neighbors” in February, Althamer has worked in partnership with a range of artists, friends, and collaborators to create sixteen new sculptures. During this period, Althamer also ran sculpture and film workshops with neighbors and a group from the Bowery Mission. Together, they will present a one-day exhibition of the new works on Thursday April 17, from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., in the New Museum’s storefront space at 231 Bowery. The exhibition will be free and open to the public.

After working closely with the Malian master sculptor Youssouf Dara on a previous project, Althamer invited him to work in New York during this exhibition. Dara often incorporates references to Dogon traditions and stories in his pieces, and a number of his artworks will be shown as part of the one-day sculpture presentation. In addition, Dara has installed a selection of his smaller pieces in the Museum Store window. The presentation on April 17 will also feature a large group self-portrait created by Althamer and his collaborators.

Draftsmen’s Congress—the collective painting project that has been evolving on the Fourth Floor—will come to a close on Sunday April 20. Over the course of the past ten weeks, the blank white space of the New Museum’s Fourth Floor gallery has been transformed through the gradual accumulation of drawings and paintings by thousands of Museum visitors and ninety invited community organizations, including school and adult education groups, hobbyists, political activists, and many other formal and informal organizations. From Wednesday April 23 through Sunday April 27, Draftsmen’s Congress will be disassembled during the Museum’s public hours: the painted walls will be cut up and distributed to visitors for free.

About Paweł Althamer
Since the early 1990s, Althamer (b. 1967 Warsaw, Poland) has established a unique artistic practice featuring an expanded approach to sculptural representation and consistently experimental models of social collaboration. Althamer is predominantly known for the figurative sculptures he creates of himself, his family, and various other individuals within his community. Beyond simple portraiture, these sculptures, in addition to the other activities he is involved in, highlight the complex social, political, and psychological networks in which he lives and operates. In many of his previous museum exhibitions, Althamer has used the visibility and resources of the organizing institution to benefit different local communities. For “The Neighbors,” Althamer initiated a coat drive for the Bowery Mission, the Museum’s neighboring organization, which has been serving the homeless and hungry since 1879. Since the show’s opening, visitors donated over 130 coats.


“Paweł Althamer: The Neighbors” closing dates:
All Floors open through April 13
April 13: Last day of Third Floor
April 17: One-day pop-up exhibition of new sculptural works at 231 Bowery, ground floor
April 20: Last day of Second Floor
April 20–27: Draftsmen’s Congress will be disassembled, cut up, and given to the public

Support
Exhibition support generously provided by Susan and Leonard Feinstein, Dakis Joannou, Katherine Farley and Jerry Speyer, and VICTORIA—the Art of being Contemporary Foundation. This presentation is made possible in part through a partnership with the Polish Cultural Institute New York. The accompanying publication is made possible by the J. McSweeney and G. Mills Publications Fund at the New Museum. Support for programs related to “Paweł Althamer: The Neighbors” is provided, in part, by American Chai Trust.

About the New Museum
The New Museum is the only museum in New York City exclusively devoted to contemporary art. Found­ed in 1977, the New Museum is a center for exhibitions, information, and documentation about living art­ists from around the world. From its beginnings as a one-room office on Hudson Street to the inauguration of its first freestanding building on the Bowery designed by SANAA in 2007, the New Museum continues to be a place of experimentation and a hub of new art and new ideas.






The New Romantics
Mark Beasley, Tim Berrensheim, Alexandra Gorczynski, Ryan Whittier Hale, Claudia Hart, Jeremiah Johnson, Brookhart Jonquil, Sophie Kahn, Alex M. Lee, Sara Ludy, Shane Mechklenburger, Jonathan Monaghan, Mikey McParlane and Michael Mallis, Brenna Murphy, Nicholas O’Brien, Jaakko Pallasvuo, Jon Rafman, Nicolas Sassoon, Jasper Spicero, Kate Steciw, Katie Torn, Krist Wood
Eyebeam
Editor's Pick
Opening on
On View
Eyebeam
Chelsea

Hours:
Tuesday - Saturday 12:00 PM - 6:00 PM


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Ryan Whittier Hale, Still from "Monolith" (2012)



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The New Romantics is an exhibition exploring the ways in which contemporary artists using digital media engage the body, representations of nature, poetic irony, and expressions of individuality as originally expressed in 19th Century Romanticism. By drawing equivalences between then and now, this exhibition identifies a critical precedent for artists today that are responding to their ever changing technological environment. Just as the Romantics responded to the industrial revolution, this group of artists are similarly responding to the current information revolution.

Curators Claudia Hart, Nicholas O’Brien, and Katie Torn have put together an exhibition that illustrates the diversity and complexity of contemporary digital production. In doing so, The New Romantics presents a unique selection of works by artists not based on formal similarities, but on expressive affinitinties. By employing a myriad of contemporary techniques - including digital fabrication, 3D simulation, software-based collage, video game engines, and peer to peer networking tools - the artists in this exhibition expose an underlying thread of individual expression that extends beyond mere tech-fetishism.

To further illustrate the multitude of ways in which comparisons between the past and the present can be understood, Eyebeam will host a series of events in tandem with the exhibition. These will include an evening of performances on 24 April 2014, and a catalog release and reception event to be held during the closing week of the exhibition.


Artists Included:

Mark Beasley, Tim Berrensheim, Alexandra Gorczynski, Ryan Whittier Hale, Claudia Hart, Jeremiah Johnson, Brookhart Jonquil, Sophie Kahn, Alex M. Lee, Sara Ludy, Shane Mechklenburger, Jonathan Monaghan, Mikey McParlane and Michael Mallis, Brenna Murphy, Nicholas O’Brien, Jaakko Pallasvuo, Jon Rafman, Nicolas Sassoon, Jasper Spicero, Kate Steciw, Katie Torn, and Krist Wood.


Performances by:

ATOM-r (Mark Jeffrey and Judd Morrissey), Zach Blas, Ann Hirsch, Miao Jiaxin, Mikey McParlane, and Vincent Tiley.






Visualizing Universalism: The UNESCO Human Rights Exhibition, 1949-1953
Columbia University
Talk on
Columbia University
Morningside Heights


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The UNESCO Human Rights Exhibition Album



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The Visualizing Universalism symposium coincides with the opening of a new exhibition at Columbia University’s the Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery, Buell Hall publicly displaying the original UNESCO Human Rights Exhibition and its archive for the first time in sixty years. UNESCO’s Human Rights Exhibition from 1949 was the first international event that sought to visually represent the history and meaning of the then-recently adopted Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Using the exhibition as a platform for critical debate on contemporary human rights culture, the symposium explores insights provided by UNESCO’s first attempt to visualize and historicize the UDHR. In three sessions, we will discuss the exhibition’s historical context, its teleological narrative, and the ways in which human rights are represented and disseminated through visual culture – questions pertinent to both the exhibition and to contemporary discussions of human rights.

For more on the 1949 Human Rights Exhibition Project, visit the project website:
http://www.exhibithumanrights.org/

This event is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served.


Schedule:


1:00pm - 1:10pm
Welcome and Introduction

1:10pm - 2:00pm
Visualizing Universalism Exhibition Presentation
Eva-Marie Prag

Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University
Katrine Bregengaard

Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University

2:00pm - 4:00pm
Panel I: Histories of Human Rights

Moderator
Yasmine Ergas

Institute for the Study of Human Rights
Samuel Moyn

Columbia University
Mark Mazower

Heyman Center for the Humanities
Columbia University
Elazar Barkan

Columbia University

4:00pm - 4:30pm
Break I

4:30pm - 6:30pm
Panel II: Visual Cultures of Human Rights

Moderator
Felicity Scott

Columbia University
Ariella Azoulay

Bar Ilan University
Anselm Franke

Extra City Center for Contemporary Art, Antwerp
Thomas Keenan

Bard College

6:30pm - 8:00pm
Visualizing Universalism Exhibition Opening Reception



Participants

Ariella Azoulay
Professor, Program for Culture and Interpretation
Bar Ilan University

Elazar Barkan
Professor of International and Public Affairs
Columbia University

Yasmine Ergas
Associate Director
Institute for the Study of Human Rights

Anselm Franke
Artistic Director
Extra City Center for Contemporary Art, Antwerp

Thomas Keenan
Associate Professor of Comparative Literature; Director, Human Rights Program
Bard College

Samuel Moyn
James Bryce Professor of European Legal History
Columbia University

Felicity Scott
Associate Professor of Architecture, Planning and Preservation
Columbia University

Mark Wasiuta
Adjunct Assistant Professsor of Architecture, Planning and Preservation
Columbia University