Screening

Misadventures in Black Dyke Dating in the 90s

Cheryl Dunye, Jocelyn Taylor, Dawn Suggs, and Shari Frilot

Misadventures in Black Dyke Dating in the 90s Cheryl Dunye, Jocelyn Taylor, Dawn Suggs, and Shari Frilot | Events Calendar


Harlem

Maysles Documentary Center | 343 Malcolm X Blvd.

Curated by Vivian Crockett, Co-presented by Queer / Art

Monday, July 6 | 7:30PM
Cheryl Dunye, Greetings From Africa, 16mm on dv, 10min., 1994
Jocelyn Taylor, Frankie and Jocie, video, 20min., 1994
Dawn Suggs, I Never Danced the Way Girls Were Supposed To, video, 7min., 1992
Aarin Burch, Spin Cycle, video, 5min., 1991
Shari Frilot, What Is A Line? , video, 10min., 1994
Maysles Cinema | 343 Malcolm X Blvd.

A showcase of films from the 1990s by black queer women filmmakers, exploring the trials and traumas of navigating dating and love at the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality. The films intermix humor, fiction, experimental visual tactics, and candid dialogue to examine relationships with family, community, romantic partners, and self.

Historian George Chauncey notes that in the 1920s, "Although Greenwich Village's gay enclave was the most famous in the city, even most white gay men thought gay life was livelier and more open in Harlem than in the Village." Its Prohibition-era gay-oriented clubs, mixing among black and white, straight and gay, featured queer performers such as Gladys Bentley. When Albert and David Maysles (Gimme Shelter, Grey Gardens) decided to open a non-profit cinema, they chose Harlem specifically to serve a community without direct access to independent cinema. The Maysles Cinema - the only independent cinema north of Lincoln Centre - is committed to creating a democratic space that provides educational outreach to the local community as well as pay-what-you-can screenings. It is located near the site of the gay club Lulu Belle, where, according to Chauncey, "thirty men were arrested for wearing drag" over a two week period in 1928.

Curator: Vivian Crockett
Co-presented by Queer / Art